Niccolò Machiavelli


Niccolo Machiavelli
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Niccolò Machiavelli (1469-1527), detail of an oil painting by Santi di Tito; in the Palazzo Vecchio, Florence, Italy
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``Machiavelli'' Britannica Online.
At least 500 years of commentary exist on the difficulty of innovation, starting with Niccolò Machiavelli (1469-1527) in The Prince (1513), Chapter 6.
``And let it be noted that there is no more delicate matter to take in hand, nor more dangerous to conduct, nor more doubtful in its success, than to set up as the leader in the introduction of changes.  For he who innovates will have for his enemies all those who are well off under the existing order of things, and only lukewarm supporters in those who might be better off under the new.''
Niccolò Machiavelli
The Prince
N. H. Thomson, translator
Dover Publications, Inc., New York, 1992, page 13.
Originally published by P. F. Collier & Son, New York, 1910.


`` We must bear in mind, then, that there is nothing more difficult and dangerous, or more doubtful of success, than an attempt to introduce a new order of things in any state.  For the innovator has for enemies all those who derived advantages from the old order of things, whilst those who expect to be benefited by the new institutions will be but lukewarm defenders.  This indifference arises in part from fear of their adversaries who were favoured by the existing laws, and partly from the incredulity of men who have no faith in anything new that is not the result of well-established experience.  Hence it is that, whenever the opponents of the new order of things have the opportunity to attack it, they will do it with the zeal of partisans, whilst the others defend it but feebly, so that it is dangerous to rely upon the latter.''
Niccolò Machiavelli
The Prince
http://www.bibliomania.com, Chapter 6.


``It must be considered that there is nothing more difficult to carry out, nor more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to handle, than to initiate a new order of things.  For the reformer has enemies in all those who profit by the old order, and only lukewarm defenders in all those who would profit by the new order, this lukewarmness arising partly from fear of their adversaries, who have the laws in their favour; and partly from the incredulity of mankind, who do not truly believe in anything new until they have had the actual experience of it.''
Niccolò Machiavelli
The Prince and The Discourses
The Modern Library, Random House, Inc., 1950, Page 21, Chapter VI


``It must be considered that there is nothing more difficult to carry out, nor more dangerous to conduct, nor more doubtful in its success, than an attempt to introduce innovations.  For the leader in the introduction of changes will have for his enemies all those who are well off under the existing order of things, and only lukewarm supporters in those who might be better off under the new.''
Niccolò Machiavelli
The Prince and The Discourses
1513, Chapter 6.